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Harding's Secret to Success

Not every little town can run a successful one-day fair with flowers and grains, hand crafts, an array of quilts, children’s school work, and the strong livestock component that Harding has.

Not every little town can run a successful one-day fair with flowers and grains, hand crafts, an array of quilts, children’s school work, and the strong livestock component that Harding has.

Just a few kilometres east of Kenton, agricultural grounds and hall are the dominant features in tiny Harding. Volunteers from the surrounding communities of Kenton and Lenore put the fair together.
Many exhibitors follow the entire milk run of fairs, having just come from Hamiota, to Harding on Friday, July 22. Then they’re off to Oak Lake Fair on the following day.
Three 6-horse draft hitches and three 4-horse hitches once again competed in Harding. Light horses showed all day in the fenced ring to the north; and after one of Harding’s famous  suppers, gymkhana ran in the evening.

Harding boasts a super cattle show, second only to the Manitoba Fall Fair in Brandon, says Jim Wilson, ring announcer. In recent years Jim’s son, Wyatt has taken on some announcing as well.  

Young people are very involved in the fair. “There were lots and lots of young people showing,” noted Wilson.

This year entries included 173 head of purebred cattle along with 28 cow/calf pairs of commercial cattle, competing for some nice prizes. Robby Young, an Angus breeder from Carievale, SK judged the cattle.

Two Royal Bank Supreme Champions are chosen, and these become entries for Canadian Western Agribition held in Regina in November.
The Supreme Bull was a two-year-old, an entry of Ramrod Cattle Co.  from Medora, MB.

Cameron Nykoliation of NYK Cattle Company from Douglas, MB won Supreme Female Champion, with a three-year–old.
Dequier Farms Hartney of Hartney won the heifer jackpot, taking home $500.

Second place was a heifer owned by Fun Bus Syndicate and JMB Charolais, receiving the $250 prize.
In preparation for this fair, Harding Ag Society put up a new 100-foot long horse barn this year.
Travis Hunter is president of the Ag Society. Wilson commented, “We’re very fortunate, every committee has good members and we all get along.”

As an announcer, he appreciates the sound equipment rented from Brandon and said, “I think one thing that really helps us, is the sound system.” It rings out clearly both in the ring and for the folks in the stands which afford shade for the audience of the cattle and heavy horse shows.