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Rodeo sportsmanship and entertainment

Virden is cowboy country and considered home for close to 30 local rodeo contestants who competed in Virden Indoor Rodeo, August 19 - 21. This rodeo drew top competitors from across the country.

Virden is cowboy country and considered home for close to 30 local rodeo contestants who competed in Virden Indoor Rodeo, August 19 - 21.

This rodeo drew top competitors from across the country. It was cowboys from Saskatchewan who took home the prestigious awards this year, at the close of Shoot-Out Sunday.

The High Point Saddle was awarded to a roper and steer wrestler from Davidson, SK, Scott Sigfusson, who has topped the Canadian Cowboy Association standings several times.

Another Saskatchewan cowboy, Monty Koopman was All Around Cowboy.

Ty Stewart from Kola won the first round in Team Roping with his partner Tyson Salmon in a noteworthy 5.0 seconds.

In Barrel Racing, Virden’s Erin Hagan won third place out of a field of 70 barrel racers in the first round, also making the ‘short go’ final round, in that event.

Bailey Plaisier of Oak Lake made the short go in the Bareback competition.

Lonnie Brown and the King brothers, Joe and Charlie, all qualified for short go in the Steer Wrestling.

Chance Horn from Virden made it into the final round in Bull Riding.

With 60 more entries than last year, enthusiasm was running high. Lonnie Brown, the Western Chair of Virden Indoor Rodeo & Wild West Daze stated, “I am personally very excited about how much more we could see this event grow in the years to come.”

For the spectators, this rodeo is a slick show. A glitch during the opening ceremonies Friday night just proved that horses are not machines – they have a mind of their own.

The handsome young Clydesdale pulling the white carriage got what Dr. Everett More termed, “a case of stage fright”. In the darkened arena with the spotlight trained on him, he planted his feet and wouldn’t move.

This was resolved peacefully when, with the light up, the guests got out of the carriage and the big horse was unhitched and led out; it required a half dozen cowboys to do the horse’s job and remove the carriage.

At half-time the border collie, Shadow, owned by Ed Hunter of Lenore, deftly rounded up the sheep for the mutton busting event where kids get their first taste of the rodeo arena on the back of a sheep – in the briefest of rides.

“We were thrilled with all our contract personnel ,” said Brown referring to stock contractors, a new announcer this year, the music man, clown Lee Bellows, television crews, and leader board operator.

“It takes a ton of people to pull off an event like this and we can't thank our committee and all of our dedicated volunteers nearly enough,” he said, adding, “None of it would be possible without all the great sponsors who have supported us for so many years.”

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