Manitoba Bear cub’s new home at a rescue

Manitoba Agriculture and Resource Development Enforcement update

 Manitoba Agriculture and Resource Development advises that conservation officers are continuing enforcement to protect Manitoba’s natural resources, including compliance checks for fisheries, addressing illegal hunting, and supporting wildfire prevention and suppression.

Wildlife and Illegal Hunting Update

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On April 27, at approximately 9 p.m. a concerned citizen contacted the TIP line to report an individual was in possession of a black bear cub. A conservation officer from the Lac du Bonnet district office immediately contacted the individual in possession of the bear to arrange retrieval, but the individual did not show up or respond to numerous attempts to contact. The officer made numerous attempts to contact the individual that evening and the next morning to try to retrieve the bear.

At approximately 5 p.m. April 28, the individual called the TIP line requesting someone retrieve the bear from his residence in Winnipeg, where he had kept it overnight. Staff from Manitoba Agriculture and Resource Development retrieved the bear immediately and transported it to Black Bear Rescue Manitoba.

On May 2, the individual was charged under section 45 of the Wildlife Act with possessing a live animal when not permitted.

If a person encounters wildlife that appears sick, injured or orphaned, they should contact a conservation officer in the local district office or call the toll-free TIP line at 1-800-782-0076 and a conservation officer will determine the best course of action for the situation.

Wasteful and illegal

During the fall 2020, members of conservation officers observed evidence of illegal hunting in the RM of Boissevain-Morton and the RM of Killarney-Turtle Mountain. After a lengthy investigation, conservation officers were able to determine that six whitetail deer were shot at night on private property. Two males from the Killarney area were charged with 27 counts under the Wildlife Act and the seizure of one firearm.  The charges include:

• six counts of night hunting,

• four counts of wasting edible portions of meat,

• four counts of hunting without a licence,

• six counts of hunting private land without permission,

• three counts of discharging a loaded firearm from a vehicle,

• two counts of hunting out of season, and

• two counts of possession of illegally taken animals.

In addition to the charges, conservation officers issued a restitution order of $7,500.

Angling Season Compliance

The recreational angling opens Saturday, May 15 in the southern division and Saturday, May 22 in the rest of the province. Manitoba Agriculture and Resource Development is reminding all anglers they are required to obtain an angling license to fish in Manitoba, unless exempt. Angling licences are now available online 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and can be immediately purchased and printed at home. For more information and to purchase an angling license, visit www.manitobaelicensing.ca/.

Conservation officers and resource management staff continue to conduct compliance checks on Manitoba’s commercial and angling fisheries throughout Manitoba. This includes checking for unmarked or illegal nets, quota violations and other infractions.

Wildfire Prevention and Suppression

Conservation officers also continue to work closely with their colleagues at the Manitoba Wildfire Service. This includes enforcement of fire bans, travel restrictions, fire investigations and assistance on fire suppression. For information on the status of fires, maps, travel restrictions, burning permit cancellations or other restrictions go to www.gov.mb.ca/wildfire/ or follow the Twitter account at https://twitter.com/mbgovnews.

Manitoba’s recreational angling and hunting regulations can be found in both the Anglers' Guide 2021 and Hunting Guide. Both documents can be found at www.gov.mb.ca/fish-wildlife/.

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