STARS, training in Virden to save lives

STARS Mobile Education, nurses practice on a mannequin

When STARS is called to transport a victim of medical trauma, the outcome is partly dependent upon the work of those first on the scene of an accident or medical crisis - first responders and the hospital staff. In rural settings medical people do not have regular experience in working with accident trauma or with the Shock Trauma Air Rescue Service.

Flight paramedics and educators with STARS, Brent Bekiaris and Troy Pauls with STARS Mobile Education bus was at Virden hospital all day on Friday, Oct. 24. They provided critical care training to some 16 people: paramedics, a physician, nursing staff and six nurses in training with Virden hospital from the Bachelor of Nursing students from Brandon University.

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Using a simulation from one of over 100 cases that STARS trains with, the mannequin, ‘Billy’, represented a 7-year-old boy, rescued from a head-on car accident. He was hooked up to heart (etc.) monitors. Guided by Pauls, the trainee nurses triaged the patient, making decisions on administering oxygen, a blood transfusion, pain meds and respond to the child’s plea to see his father, all in preparation for the patient’s transfer to another hospital.

Pauls explained, “This costs the hospital nothing. When we fly into these communities and the patients are more stable now because of the things that they’ve learned in simulation, it’s a win-win for the patient.”

Flight paramedics and educators with STARS, Brent Bekiaris and Troy Pauls with STARS Mobile Education bus was at Virden hospital all day on Friday, Oct. 24. They provided critical care training to some 16 people: paramedics, a physician, nursing staff and six nurses in training with Virden hospital from the Bachelor of Nursing students from Brandon University.

Using a simulation from one of over 100 cases that STARS trains with, the mannequin, ‘Billy’, represented a 7-year-old boy, rescued from a head-on car accident. He was hooked up to heart (etc.) monitors. Guided by Pauls, the trainee nurses triaged the patient, making decisions on administering oxygen, a blood transfusion, pain meds and respond to the child’s plea to see his father, all in preparation for the patient’s transfer to another hospital.

Pauls explained, “This costs the hospital nothing. When we fly into these communities and the patients are more stable now because of the things that they’ve learned in simulation, it’s a win-win for the patient.”

During the April 2018 – March 2019 fiscal year STARS flew over 620 missions. In Virden area: Sioux Valley -1; Hamiota – 1; Miniota – 1; Pipestone – 1; Scarth -1; Sioux Valley – 1; Virden - 4

© Virden Empire-Advance

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